Sample of thesis evaluation report

Occasionally attempts have been made to “get around” the actor, to envelop him in masks, to set up a few “conventions” for him to stumble over, or even to develop little breeds of actors for some special Art drama. Yet it would be a profound error not to recognise the fact, that there is a real kinship between the two. The man who has broke through all those measures of conduct, which can alone render him agreeable to mankind, though he should have the most perfect assurance that what he had done was for ever to be concealed from every human eye, it is all to no purpose. It should be noted, however, that in many of these, as in the modern German _gluck_, it means happiness as well as chance. The question has been often raised how long a savage tribe, ignorant of writing, is likely to retain the memory of past deeds. He was bound to pay his accuser only a portion of the fine which he would incur if proved guilty—a portion varying with different offences from one-fourth to one-sixth of the _wer-gild_. _S._ Yes, in a very notable way, after their fashion. Stories of wild adventure from _Gil Blas_ to _Tom Jones_ are “humorous” to the multitude in this sense. In England, the amiable Mr. Language is the medium of our communication with the thoughts of others. We should expect that a considerable development of vocal power would be a condition of man’s taking heartily to this mode of emotional utterance. sample of thesis evaluation report See “The Fertility of the Unfit,” by W. Malice often takes the garb of truth. inches.[408] This is very close to an even third of the _octacatl_, and would thus be a common divisor of lengths laid off by it. By far the larger share of the pleasure of the practical joke certainly falls, however, to the perpetrator, who in this case, too, realises a “sudden glory,” an increased sense of power. How many great qualities must that writer possess, who can thus render his very faults agreeable? Spurzheim gets down to the visible region of the face, the eyes, forehead, &c. But it may be urged, and rightly urged, that the laughable spectacle is more than this, that what tickles us is the uncustomary and topsy-turvy arrangement of things. On the other hand to say that this species of elective affinity is determined in it’s operation by the greater readiness with which the idea of a particular impression recalls the memory of another impression which co-existed with it in a state of sensible excitement is to repeat the fact but not (that I can perceive) in any manner to account for it. you have nothing to fear. If there is any society among robbers and murderers, they must at least, according to the trite observation, abstain from robbing and murdering one another. Fear is the chief element of remorse: fear of our fellow-men, vague fears for the future, or in the most literal sense the fear of Divine retribution or God. But thunder and lightning, storms and sunshine, those more irregular events, were ascribed to his favour, or his anger. They can distinguish the hard edges and determinate outline of things; but are alike insensible to the stronger impulses of passion, to the finer essences of thought. Lucien Adam, who had long occupied himself with American tongues, and he entered into correspondence with M. [Footnote 1: It must be observed, that the whole of this Essay was written previous to the date here mentioned; and that the return of the comet happened agreeably to the prediction.] But of all the attempts of the Newtonian philosophy, that which would appear to be the most above the reach of human reason and experience, is the attempt to compute the weights and densities of the Sun, and of the several Planets. l. The Abbe Brasseur indeed, in a note to Landa, explains it to mean “a book of wood,” but it can have no such signification. Even greater troubles may, to the trained humorist, disclose amusing aspects or accompaniments, so that refreshment reaches us even while the blow still hurts. They are almost always men of the most amiable simplicity sample of thesis evaluation report of manners, who live in good harmony with one another, are the friends of one another’s reputation, enter into no intrigue in order to secure the public applause, but are pleased when their works are approved of, without being either much vexed or very angry when they are neglected. The cant about the horrors of the French Revolution is mere cant—every body knows it to be so: each party would have retaliated upon the other: it was a civil war, like that for a disputed succession: the general principle of the right or wrong of the change remained untouched. It is the juxtaposition and interaction of two tendencies of widely removed {340} moral levels, and quite disproportionate in their strength which supplies the rich variety of the entertaining. Heat and cold, in reality, though they may frequently be perceived by the same parts of the human body, constitute an order of sensations altogether different from those which are the proper objects of Touch. Even in a free and enlightened country we may observe in officials a tendency now and again to inflate their dignity unduly; so that one infers that the restraining force of the laughter of inferiors still counts. Mr. {330} How far humour will help a man in throwing off troubles one cannot say. _No._ 25.—_Admitted_ 1803.—_Aged_ 28. Even when the spirit of the age (that is, the progress of intellectual refinement, warring with our natural infirmities) no longer allows us to carry our vindictive and headstrong humours into effect, we try to revive them in description, and keep up the old bugbears, the phantoms of our terror and our hate, in imagination. AN ESSAY In Defence of the Female Sex, _&c._ The Conversation we had ’tother day, makes me, Dear _Madam_, but more sensible of the unreasonableness of your desire; which obliges me to inform you further upon a Subject, wherein I have more need of your instruction. I know nothing in the world so affecting as this. Yet how nearly, at one time, it had come to be engrafted on the law of the land is evident from its being sufficiently recognized as a legal procedure for persons of noble blood to claim immunity from it, and for the judges to admit that claim as a special privilege. Two persons accidentally meeting together, and who had never seen one another before shall conceive a more violent antipathy to each other in consequence of a dispute on religion or politics than they might have done from having been personally at variance half their lives. The general word _river_, therefore, was, it is evident, in his acceptance of it, a proper name, signifying an individual object. We take rapturous possession with one sense, the eye; but the artist’s pencil acts as a nonconductor to the grosser desires. The unexpected sound of the father’s voice at the end of a long day devoted to the things of the nursery was, we are told, enough to evoke a shout of laughter in a small American boy: it sufficed to bring back to the little fellow’s consciousness another and a glorious world. Nothing is too early or too late to me which is seasonable for thee.

Just as tragic fear and pity may give way to physical revulsion when horror obtrudes itself, so when in comedy the unclean thrusts into view its ugly head, a sort of physical revulsion may silence laughter. When all thus was violence, and the law of the strongest was scarcely tempered by written codes, it is easy to imagine that the personal inviolability of the freeman speedily ceased to guarantee protection. The question how far this utility extends is one which cannot be answered simply. When men by their practice, and perhaps too by their maxims, manifestly show that the natural beauty of virtue is not like to have much effect upon {265} them, how is it possible to move them but by representing the folly of their conduct, and how much they themselves are in the end likely to suffer by it? Smeaton ascertained by experiment that in a canal four miles in length, the water was kept up four inches higher at one end than at the other, merely by the action of wind along the canal; sample of thesis evaluation report and Rennell informs us that a large piece of water, ten miles broad, and generally only three feet deep, has by a strong wind had its waters driven to one side, and sustained so as to become six feet deep, while the windward side was laid dry. I drank of the stream of knowledge that tempted, but did not mock my lips, as of the river of life, freely. Hobbes, by propagating these notions, to subject the consciences of men immediately to the civil, and not to the ecclesiastical powers, whose turbulence and ambition, he had been taught, by the example of his own times, to regard as the principal source of the disorders of society. On the other hand, a public library that has developed from a charitable foundation regards these as its proper users and looks askance at the well-to-do, as in the case of the good lady with her “carriage people.” When I speak of the exclusion of a class of persons, I do not mean that they are formally kept out or even consciously discouraged; this is why it is so easy to be a librarian of the day before yesterday. To prevent these consequences, I shall state all that I think ought to be done, in another number of this work; which I conceive is the most interesting part in the treatment of insanity. We all grew up in this library.” I confess that this anecdote sends a little thrill of satisfaction thru me every time I tell it. We have the same respect for Blake’s philosophy (and perhaps for that of Samuel Butler) that we have for an ingenious piece of home-made furniture: we admire the man who has put it together out of the odds and ends about the house. Constructed as a code for the government of the Latin kingdoms of the East, in 1099, by order of Godfrey of Bouillon, it has reached us only in the form assumed about the period under consideration, and as it presents the combined experience of the warriors of many Western races, its silence on the subject of conjurators is not a little significant. Suicide, however, never seems to have been very common among the Greeks. Is your collection in this class small and poor? Those of us who prize the free circulation of laughter as that of a sea-air, and are disposed to object to the closeness of mental atmosphere which seems to enfold the devoted, shall do well to remember how much the world owes to a lack of humour in its citizens. In _Catiline_ Jonson conforms, or attempts to conform, to conventions; not to the conventions of antiquity, which he had exquisitely under control, but to the conventions of tragico-historical drama of his time. But we abhorred insipidity, affectation, and fine gentlemen. This was well attended, and it appeared that much of the feeling was due to misunderstanding. The representation of this exhibits one of the most interesting, and perhaps the most instructive spectacle that was ever introduced upon any theatre. INTRODUCTION.–The propriety of every passion excited by objects peculiarly related to ourselves, the pitch which the spectator can go along with, must lie, it is evident, in a certain mediocrity. Thus Mr. He is guilty of vanity who desires praise for qualities which are either not praise-worthy in any degree, or not in that degree in which he expects to be praised for them; who sets his character upon the frivolous ornaments of dress and equipage, or upon the equally frivolous accomplishments of ordinary behaviour. Even in the fifteenth century, when the combat was rapidly becoming obsolete, this faith is pictorially embodied in an illuminated MS. None but those of the happiest mould are capable of suiting, with exact justness, their sentiments and behaviour to the smallest difference of situation, and of acting upon all occasions with the most delicate and accurate propriety. They may discover as much both of taste and genius in the one as in the other. Raphael painted Italian faces as well as Titian. At this unanswerable decision, the people with one accord shouted “Jus Abbendoni?, jus Abbendoni?!” and so powerful was the impression produced, that the worthy chronicler assures us that thenceforth neither king, nor duke, nor prince dared to lay claim to the lands of Beri, showing conclusively the wisdom of the abbot who preferred thus to rely upon his right rather than on mouldy charters or dilatory pleadings.[1130] A more prosaic form of the ordeal of chance is the trial by Bible and key which is of old Teutonic origin.[1131] It is still in common use in England, where it may even yet “be met with in many an out-of-the-way-farm-house.” In cases of theft a key is secured at Psalm 50, 18: “When thou sawest a thief, then thou consentedst with him, and hast been partaker with adulterers;”[1132] and the mode in which it is expected to reveal guilt is manifested in a case recorded in the London _Times_ as occurring at Southampton in 1867, where a sailor boy on board a collier was brought before court on a charge of theft, the only evidence against him being that afforded by securing a key in a Bible opposite the first chapter of Ruth. Thus, an agreement of 1193, between the Countess of St. He levels his Scandal at the whole Sex, and thinks us sufficiently fortified, if out of the Story of Two Thousand Years he has been able to pick up a few Examples of Women illustrious for their Wit, Learning or Vertue, and Men infamous for the contrary; though I think the most inveterate of our Enemies would have spar’d him that labour, by granting that all Ages have produc’d Persons famous or infamous of both Sexes; or they must throw up all pretence to Modesty, or Reason. As friendship and love yield the most exalted pleasure, from this root the natives drew a fund of words to express fondness, attachment, hospitality, charity; and from the same worthy source they selected that adjective which they applied to the greatest and most benevolent divinity.[370] II. They are of opinion that the appellations of the native gods were derived from trivial or accidental circumstances, and had no recondite or symbolic meaning. It was not invented till after those appearances had been observed, with some accuracy, for more than a century together; and it was not completely digested by Ptolemy till the reign of Antoninus, after a much longer course of observations. Insomuch that according to the general diffusion of any element of thought or feeling, and its floating through the mixed mass of human affairs, do we stand in need of a greater quantity of that refined experience I have spoken of, and of a quicker and firmer tact in connecting or distinguishing its results. “Indirect crook’d” is forceful in Shakespeare; a mere pleonasm in Massinger. The clearest example, I have met with, of what we should call a dry humour is to be found in the work just quoted. This habit has become perfectly familiar to him. It is not improbable that the physiological processes, that is to say, the respiratory movements, the vocalisation, and the more diffused organic effects, will be altered in such cases. For a pure journalist will not know any period well enough; a pure dilettante will know it too egotistically, as a fashion of his own. One of the most important and fascinating branches of modern mathematics–the theory of chances or probabilities, deals with what may be called luck, and with its laws. The hardness or softness of bodies, or the greater or smaller force with which they resist any change of shape, seems to depend altogether upon the stronger or weaker degree of cohesion with which their parts are mutually attracted to one another. Little boys, I suspect, are much given to experiments in a violent kind of fun which they know to be disorderly. Thus, in 819, Louis le Debonnaire decreed that, in cases where testimony was evenly balanced, one of the witnesses from each side should be chosen to fight it out, the defeated champion suffering the usual penalty of perjury—the loss of a hand; while the remaining witnesses on the losing side were allowed the privilege of redeeming their forfeited members at the regular legal rate.[525] William sample of thesis evaluation report the Conqueror imposed a fine of forty sous on the losing side impartially;[526] this was increased to sixty sous by the compilation known as the laws of Henry I.;[527] and the same regulation is stated by Glanville, with the addition that the defeated person was forever disqualified as a witness or champion;[528] but in practice the amount seems to have been indefinite, for in the Pipe Rolls the fines levied for _recreantise_ vary from one mark to a hundred.[529] In a case occurring in 1221 where the defendant was victorious the record simply states that the appellant was ordered into custody;[530] while in the time of Edward II. Now let us get down to something concrete. But these, as well as all the other passions of human nature, seem proper and are approved of, when the heart of every impartial spectator entirely sympathizes with them, when every indifferent by-stander entirely enters into and goes along with them. It is true, Marcian Colonna is a dainty book; and the reading of Mr. The authority of conscience is thus paramount for the individual; it will be better for me to do what is objectively wrong, but what I conscientiously believe to be right, than do what is in fact right, but what my conscience disapproves.”[19] Here the writer appears to abandon his Rationalistic friends altogether; the fanatic is given free rein, his ravings are sacred. It is a matter of fact, that the natives of the South Sea Islands speak a language of their own, and if we were to go there, it might be of more use to us than Greek and Latin—but _not till then_! Ye men of Itza, hearken to the tidings, Listen to the forecaste of this cycle’s end; Four have been the ages of the world’s progressing. When distinctly called upon, he will not decline the service of his country, but he will not cabal in order to force himself into it, and would be much better pleased that the public business were well managed by some other person, than that he himself should have the trouble, and incur the **responsibility, of managing it.